Syllabus

REGULATION, SCHEME OF EXAMINATION AND SYLLABUS FOR THE MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS (M.P.E.S.) PROGRAMME

The main objective of the M P E.S. programme is to provide opportunity for Professional training in Physical Education to students with physical education background and aptitude for higher studies. M.P.E.S. Degree is one of the qualifications for appointment as Physical Education Teachers and lectures in Schools, Colleges, and Universities etc. They can also work as instructors, trainers and coaches in fitness centers, health clubs, in companies and sports clubs.

  1. DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME: The duration of the programme shall be two academic years with four semesters.
  2. ELIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION : A candidate for admission to the two year Master of Physical Education and Sports (M.P.E.S) degree programme shall fulfil the following conditions:

(a) Should have passed the Bachelor degree in Physical Education (B.P.E/B.P.E.S) of any university recognized by the Mahatma Gandhi University OR have passed a post graduate degree or diploma (B.P.Ed./D.P.Ed) in Physical Education of at least one year duration of an Indian or Foreign University or Board appointed by the Education Department of the State or Union Territory recognized by the Mahatma Gandhi University, with a minimum of 50% marks in aggregate.

(b) Should be physically fit for daily heavy load of physical activities and should not have physical deformity or mental disability.

  1. SELECTION CRITERIA :The candidate shall be selected for admission from the rank list prepared on the basis of the following criteria.

(a) Written test (Based on B.P.E./ B.P.Ed. Syllabus)   – 50 marks

(b) Game Proficiency & Achievement                               – 25 marks

(c) Physical fitness test (A A H P E R D)                          –  15 marks

(d) Sports achievement                                                        – 10 marks

Total    – 100 marks

  1. PROGRAMME OF STUDY

The Programme of study for the M P E S. programme will have two Parts

  1. Part – A Theory
  2. Part – B Elective ( Theory &Practical ) General conditioning, Major Games
  1. Part-A Theory

First Semester

Paper I   : Research Methodology and Statistics in Physical Education

Paper II : Measurements and Evaluation in Physical Education

Paper III:Sports Management

Second Semester

Paper IV :Physiology of Sports and Exercise

Paper V    :Sports Training and Talent Identification

Paper VI    :Health and Fitness Education

Third Semester

Paper VII   : Exercise Psychology

Paper VIII : Biomechanics

Paper IX      :Exercise Prescription and Programme design

Paper X       : Sports Specialisation

Fourth Semester

Paper XI   : Sports Medicine

Paper XII   : Sports Specialization

Paper XIII  :Thesis/Dissertation

Paper IX      : Professional Preparation and Curriculum Design in Physical Education

  1. Part-B ELECTIVE
  2. a) Practical General Conditioning, and Match Practice is compulsory for all and apart from this 6 Major Games activities can be selected out of the 10 Electives depending up on the facilities available in the School.

(1) General Conditioning and Match Practice (Compulsory) (2) Basketball (3) Judo (4) Track and Field (5) Handball (6) Yoga (7) Volleyball (8) Football (9) Tennis (10) Softball (11) Cricket

  1. b) Sports Specialization ( Theory & Practical) – Any Two sports discipline from the following activities shall be allotted subject to the availability of facilities and experts.

1.Basketball     2 Judo             3. Football       4. Cricket         5.Track and Field

6.Volleyball     7. Handball     8.Yoga

  1. C. Advanced Coaching Ability & Officiating ( Theory & Practical) in any one of the following major games ( Handball, Basketball, Judo and Football, Cricket, Volleyball, Track and Field)

 

  1. LIST OF COURSES FOR MPES DEGREE PROGRAMME
 

Sl.No.

 

SEMESTER

 

PART

 

COURSE

CODE

 

TITLE

 

CORE/ ELECTIVE

 

CREDITS

1  

 

 

 

 

I

 

 

 

A

SPEMIC1901 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY & STATISTICS CORE 4
2 SPEMIC1902 MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CORE 4
3 SPEMIC1903 SPORTS MANAGEMENT CORE 4
4  

 

 

B

SPEMIE1951 GENERAL CONDITIONING & MATCH PRACTISE ELECVTIVE 2
5 SPEMIE1952 Major Game I      ( Basketball) ELECVTIVE 2
6 SPEMIE1953 Major Game II    ( Judo) ELECVTIVE 2
7 SPEMIE1954 Major Game III   ( Track and Field) ELECVTIVE 2
8 SPEMIE1955 Major Game  IV   (Handball) ELECVTIVE 2
9 SPEMIE1956 Major Game V  (Yoga) ELECVTIVE 2
10  

 

 

II

 

 

A

 

 

SPEMIIC1904 PHYSIOLOGY OF SPORTS & EXERCISE CORE 4
11 SPEMIIC1905 SPORTS TRAINING & TALENT IDENTIFICATION CORE 4
12 SPEMIIC1906 HEALTH & FITNESS EDUCATION CORE 4
13  

 

B

SPEMIIE1957 GENERAL CONDITIONING & MATCH PRACTISE ELECVTIVE 2
14 SPEMIIE1958 Major Game VI   (Volleyball

 

 

)

ELECVTIVE 2
15 SPEMIIE1959 Major Game VII  ( Football) ELECVTIVE 2
16 SPEMIIE1960 Major Game VIII (Tennis) ELECVTIVE 2
17 SPEMIIE1961 Major Game IX  (Softball) ELECVTIVE 2
18 SPEMIIE1962 Major Game X  (Cricket) ELECVTIVE 2
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPEMIIIC1907

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

20 SPEMIIIC1908 SPORTS BIOMECHANICS CORE 4
21 SPEMIIIC1909 EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION & PROGRAMME DESIGN CORE 4
22 SPEMIIIC1910 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(BASKETBALL/ JUDO, TRACK AND FIELD, HANDBALL)

CORE 4
23 SPEMIIIC1911 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(FOOTBALL/CRICKET, VOLLEYBALL, YOGA)

CORE 4
24  

B

 

SPEMIIIE1963 ADVANCED COACHING ABILITY & OFFICATING

( ANY ONE FROM BASKETBALL / JUDO/ FOOTBALL/ CRICKET))

ELECVTIVE 2
 

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV

 

 

 

 

 

A

 

 

 

 

SPEMIVC1912 SPORTS MEDICINE CORE 4
26 SPEMIVC1913 PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION & CURRICULUM DESIGN IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CORE 4
27 SPEMIVC1914 THESIS/ DESSERTATION CORE 4
28 SPEMIVC1915 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(BASKETBALL/ JUDO, TRACK AND FIELD, HANDBALL)

CORE 4
29 SPEMIVC1916 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(FOOTBALL/CRICKET, VOLLEYBALL, YOGA)

CORE 4
30  

B

SPEMIVE1964 ADVANCED COACHING ABILITY & OFFICATING

( ANY ONE FROM BASKETBALL / JUDO/ FOOTBALL/ CRICKET, TRACK AND FIELD, HANDBALL,VOLLEYBALL))

ELECVTIVE 2

 

  1. ATTENDANCE

Each semester will have a minimum of 90 working days and each working day will have three theory classes and five practical hours. Candidate must secure at least 75% of attendance in the lecture delivered in each of the theory subjects in the Part –A and the Theory and Practical of Part –B and complete the prescribed course of laboratory works, tutorials, seminars, projects, assignments etc. to appear for the university examinations.

  1. Evaluation:

7.1. External & Internal Evaluation: Evaluation of the post graduate courses for the first and third semester examinations shall be done by the faculty members themselves on the basis of continuous internal assessment and end semester examinations. Evaluation for all the courses of the second and the fourth semester examinations of the post graduate programmes, except for practical examinations in science subjects, shall be conducted both externally and internally. In the Centres/Institutes, the evaluation of answer books are carried out by External Examiners  and evaluation pattern for all the semesters of Institutes/Centres shall be decided by the concerned Faculty Council of the Centre/Institutes. The performance of a student in each course is evaluated in terms of percentage of marks with a provision for conversion to grade points.

Students who secure a minimum attendance of 75% and above in a semester, and who pass the Internal Examinations of all the courses of the semester, alone, will be allowed to appear for the end semester examination and continue in the programme to the next higher semester.

However, failed students can approach the Grievance Redressal Committee (The Faculty Council) in case of failure in Internal Examinations, and the decision of the Faculty Council in this regard will be final. Faculty Council may permit students to repeat the course in appropriate cases, but only once in a programme.

7.2. Question paper setting: The Faculty Council of each School shall prepare the panel of question paper setters for each programme and get it approved by the Vice Chancellor. The Director/Head of the Schools/ Centre/Institute will make arrangements for getting the question papers set by external experts who shall be selected from the panel approved by the the Vice-Chancellor

The Faculty Council shall as far as possible recommend teachers of other Universities as External Examiners . Only in emergencies, senior Associate Professors of Colleges may be recommended as External Examiners  of a University Programme.

7.3. Process of Evaluation: The double valuation of answer scripts in the second and the fourth semester courses shall be done by External Examiners and the faculty concerned respectively as decided by the Director.

The Director/Head of the School/Department/Centres/Institutes will make arrangements for the evaluation of the answer scripts. The Project/Dissertation shall be evaluated by two examiners, one of them the Faculty member who supervised the Project and the other an external examiner to be decided by the Director from a panel approved by the Vice Chancellor. The comprehensive viva-voce, if any, must be carried out along with Project Evaluation in the fourth semester.

7.4. Internal Assessment: The student’s attendance and classroom performance as well as the feedback received from tests, tutorials, assignments and term papers shall form the basis for internal assessment. The internal assessment will be a continuous assessment (CA) that accounts for 50% of the evaluation in both theory and practical.

7.4.1. Continuous Assessment (CA): This assessment shall be based on a predetermined transparent system involving periodic written tests, assignments and seminars in respect of theory courses and based on tests, lab skill, records/viva and attendance in respect of practical courses.

 

7.4.2. The percentage of marks assigned to various components for Internal Evaluation is as follows:

 

(a) Theory

Components % of internal marks

i) Two test papers 60%

 

ii) Assignments/Book review/Debates 20%
iii) Seminars/Presentation of case study 20%

 

(b) Practicals

Components % of internal marks

i) Two test paper 40%

 

ii) Lab Skill 25%
iii) Records/Viva 25%
iv) Attendance 10%

 

For each course there shall be at least two class tests during a semester. Best of the marks obtained in the two tests will be counted as the internal test component of CAS. The probable dates of the tests shall be announced at the beginning of each semester. Marks should be displayed on the notice board. Valued answer scripts shall be made available to the students for perusal within 10 working days from the date of the tests.

Assignments: Each student shall be required to do 2 assignments/book reviews for each course. Assignments/book review after valuation must be returned to the students. The teacher shall define the expected quality of the above in terms of structure, content, presentation and the like, and inform the same to the students. Punctuality in submission of assignments/records is to be given a weightage in the internal evaluation.

Seminar: Every student shall deliver one seminar as an internal component of every course and must be evaluated by the respective course teacher in terms of structure, content, presentation and interaction. The soft and hard copies of the seminar report are to be submitted to the teacher in charge.

Practical Records: All the records of continuous assessment (CA) must be kept in the department and that must be made available for verification. For Sports Specialization each student should maintain a record book and take at least 20 coaching classes internally and externally, to appear for the University examination.

Results of Internal Assessment: The results of the CA shall be displayed on the notice board within 5 working days from the last day of a semester. It should be counter signed by the candidates. The marks awarded for various components of the CA shall not be rounded off, if it has a decimal part. The total marks of the CA shall be rounded off to the nearest whole number.

Once the Score-Sheet for CA duly attested by the Director is forwarded to the CSS office for issue of mark lists, no further change in the grades entered in the same will be entertained. Improvement in the internal assessment grade will not be possible in any circumstance for a student after the completion of a semester programme.

 

7.5. End-Semester Examination: The end semester examination will account for the remaining 50% of the evaluation which will be done by the School/Department/ Center/Institute in accordance with the provisions in Section 8.1.

The evaluation of the end-semester examination of the first and third semesters shall generally be done by the faculty who taught the course, though a School/Department/Center/Institute can opt to have the examiner from outside the university, if the faculty council so decides. Evaluation of the 2nd and 4th semester courses based on questions set by external question paper setters shall be evaluated by two examiners; one, the external (as far as possible the question paper setter shall evaluate the examination paper as well) and the other, internal examiners.

7.5.1. Project Work: There shall be a project/dissertation to be undertaken by all students. The dissertation entails field work, lab work, report writing, presentation and viva voce. The class hours allotted for project work may be clustered into a single slot so that students can do their work at a centre /location for a continuous period of time. However, appropriate changes can be made by the faculty council in this regard.

 

Project/Dissertation shall be carried out under the supervision of a teacher in the parent School/Centre/Institute or other research institutes or industrial establishment or University Departments if they permit the students to do so, after getting permission from the Department Head.

In such cases, one of the teachers from the schools/centres/institutes would be the co-supervisor/internal guide and an expert from the industry/ research organization concerned shall act as supervisor/ external guide. Project/Dissertation shall be submitted to the Head of the Department two weeks before the commencement of the end semester examination of the final semester.

7.5.2. External Evaluation of Theory Answer Scripts: The external evaluation shall be done after the examination at the earliest, preferably in a centralized valuation. As far as possible bar coded Answer Books shall be used to ensure confidentiality. The evaluation of the answer scripts shall be done by examiners based on a well-defined scheme of valuation. There shall be double valuation system of answer books in the 2nd and 4th Semester evaluations. The final marks awarded will be the average of two. If there is a variation of more than 10 % of the maximum marks, the answer books shall be valued by a third external examiner appointed by the Director. The final marks to be awarded shall be the average of the nearest two out of three awarded by the examiners.

7.5.3. External Evaluation of Practical Courses: End semester evaluation in practical courses shall be conducted and evaluated by two examiners; one internal and one external or both internal as may be decided by the Faculty Council. Duration of practical external examinations shall be decided by the concerned Faculty Council.

7.5.4. Evaluation of the project work shall be carried out at the end of the programme. The title and the credit with marks awarded for the project work should be entered in the grade/mark sheet approved by the University

Process of evaluation of project work:

  1. The end semester evaluation of the Project/Dissertation shall be done both internally and externally; external evaluation shall be conducted by external examiner as per clause 7.3, paragraph-2.
  2. Evaluation of the Project Report shall also be done under numerical mark system.

The evaluation of the project will be done at two stages:

  1. Continuous Assessment (CA) (supervising teacher/s will assess the project and award Internal Marks).
  2. External evaluation (by external examiner).
  3. Marks secured for the project will be awarded to candidates, combining the internal and external Marks.
  4. The internal to external component is to be taken in the ratio 1:1.

Internal Assessment of project work shall be completed within 2 weeks before the last working day of a semester. Internal Assessment marks should be published in the Department/Centre notice board.

Conditions of Pass in the Project:

  1. Submission of the Project/Dissertation and Viva are compulsory for internal evaluation.
  2. A student shall be declared to have passed in the Project/Dissertation only if she/he secures minimum C grade (45 % marks of the aggregate and 45% separately for external).

8.GRADING SYSTEM

The grading system followed is that of relative grading on a ten-point scale. The following table indicates the performance range and the relative value of the grades(grade point) on the scale

LETTER GRADE PERFOMANCE GRADE POINT
O Out Standing 10
A Plus Excellent 9
A Only Very Good 8
B Plus Good 7
B Only Above Average 6
C Pass 5
F Fail <5
Ab Absent

 

  1. MINIMUM GRADE FOR PASSING IN A COURSE OR PROGRAMME:

 The minimum grade for passing a particular course will be ‘C’. The minimum CGPA for a pass in the  M.P.E.S  programmes will be 5.

  1. ISSUE OF GRADE CARD:

Grade card will be given to the student at the end of each semester that will indicate the grades he/she has obtained as well as the Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA) which is the weighted average of the numerical value (grade point) obtained by him/her in the semester. Weighted average is calculated by dividing the sum of the product of the grade point or numerical value obtained for each course and the credits that it carries by the total number of credits earned. The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for the whole programme will be calculated in the same way, which will also be indicated in the Grade Card.

Minimum SGPA in all semesters is not an assurance to minimum CGPA for the entire programme.

  1. PERCENTAGE EQUIVALENCE OF GRADE:
Range of % of Marks Grade Letter Grade Point
95 – ≤100 O 10
85 – <95 A plus 9
75 – <85 A only 8
65 – <75 B plus 7
55 – <65 B only 6
45 – <55 C 5
    <45 F 0
Absent Ab 0

 

 

  1. CALCULATION OF SEMESTER GRADE POINT AVERAGE (SGPA) :

Credit Points for the Course = No. of Credits assigned for the course x Grade Point secured for that course. SGPA indicates the performance of a student in a given Semester. SGPA is based on the total credit points earned by a student in all the courses divided by the total number of credits assigned to the courses required in a Semester. Note: SGPA is computed only if the candidate passes in all the required courses (gets a minimum required grade for a pass in all the required courses as per the specific curriculum). Securing of SGPA in all semesters may not enable students to have minimum required CGPA for a pass in the programme.

SGPA  = Total credit points earned by the student from all the required courses of a Semester

                           Total credits of all courses required in a semester

  1. CALCULATION OF CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE (CGPA) :

 

CGPA refers to the Cumulative Grade Point Average weighted across all the semesters (4 Semesters). CGPA is obtained by dividing the total number of credit points earned by the student in all the semesters by the total number of required credits of all the Semesters as per curriculum.

CGPA = Total CPts of Semester- S1 + 2 + 3 + 4 …

Total Credits of Semester- S1 + 2 + 3 + 4..

OR

SGPA of I Semester x Total Credits of I Sem] + [SGPA of II Semester x Total Credits of II Sem] + [SGPA of III Semester x Total Credits of III Sem] + [SGPA of IV Semester x Total Credits of IV Sem]

______________________________________________________________________________

Total Credits of I Semester + Total credits of II Semester + Total credits of III Semester + Total credits of IV Semester

  1. CONVERSION OF SGPA/CGPA TO GRADE

 

10
O
9.0 – < 10 A Plus
8.0 – <9 A only
7.0 – <8 B plus
6.0 – <7 B only
5.0 – <6 C
 <5 F
Absent Ab

 

  1. CONVERSION OF CGPA TO PERCENTAGE

Equivalent Percentage = (CGPA obtained) X 100

Maximum CGPA (=10)

  1. POSITION CERTIFICATE:

The position certificate shall be given for the 1st five positions. Students who have completed the course by availing of the improvement examinations for a course or reappearance for a course will not be eligible for position certificate.

If Rank certificate in a prescribed format is demanded by institutions for awarding a specific fellowship/scholarship such as for DST Inspire Fellowship etc, the rank certificate may be given for such students as a special case in the prescribed format.

This formula shall be printed on the Grade Card issued to the student with a note that it could be used to convert the grades into mark-percentages. (The details of the grading system as indicated in section 11 & 12 above shall also be printed on the Grade Card).

 

  1. CONSOLIDATION AND DECLARATION OF RESULTS:

All work pertaining to the examinations shall be held in the Schools/ Centres/Institute of study and research under the direct control and supervision of the Directors/Heads of the Departments. The Director of each School/Center/Institute will, in consultation with the Faculty Council directly control the Internal/External examinations and evaluations or nominate a teacher as the Chief Examiner who will assist him/her in the matter. The marks awarded for internal assessment will be displayed in the School’s notice board at the end of each semester. If a student has any complaint regarding the marks received in internal assessment, he/she should report it to the Faculty Member concerned within 3 working days from the date of publication of the same on the notice board. Thereafter, complaints against internal marks will not be entertained under any circumstance. The Pass Board of a School/ Centre/Institute will consist of selected teachers/ the entire Faculty of the School/Department/Centre/Institute concerned and will be constituted by the Director in consultation with the Faculty Council. The tabulated grade sheets will be forwarded after each end-semester examination to the office of the Controller of Examinations. The CSS section in the Controller’s office will check the Grade card forwarded from the Department/School/Centre/Institute and notify the results after consolidating them and issue statement of credits. On completion of the final semester a Consolidated Grade Card showing the details of all the courses taken will be prepared. The Consolidated Grade Card containing the details of all the courses with their titles, credits, grades obtained, the total credits earned, the SGPA and the CGPA will be issued to students.

  1. Issue of Certificates:

On completion of a semester (when results are ready) the Director/Coordinators of all programmes shall forward tabulated grade sheets along with the minutes of the Pass Board meeting showing details to the CSS Section; in the case of final semester, consolidated details of all semesters showing total number of candidates registered, appeared and passed in the prescribed format shall also be furnished.

Grade cards to all students who have undergone the courses under the CSS are issued by the office of the Controller of Examinations through the Departments/Schools concerned. Consolidated Grade Cards are also issued. Fee for the issue of grade cards will be announced by the University from time to time.

  1. SCHEME OF EXAMINATION

 

               M.P.E.S FIRST SEMESTER

PART COURSE

CODE

TITLE NO. OF TEACHING HOURS DURATION OF EXAM INTERNAL MARKS UNIVERSITY EXAM MARKS TOTAL MARKS CREDITS
 

 

A

SPEMIC1901 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY & STATISTICS 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIC1902 MEASUREMENT & EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIC1903 SPORTS MANAGEMENT 100 3 50 50 100 4
TOTAL(PRT A) 300   150 150 300 12
 

 

 

 

 

B

SPEMIE1951 GENERAL CONDITIONING & MATCH PRACTISE  

100

 

3

 

50

 

50

 

100

 

2

SPEMIE1952 Major Game I                   ( Basketball)   

100

 

3

 

50

 

50

 

100

2
SPEMIE1953 Major Game II                  ( Judo)   )          

100

 

3

 

50

 

50

 

100

2
SPEMIE1954 Major Game III                  ( Track and Field  )   

100

 

3

 

50

 

50

 

100

2
SPEMIE1955 Major Game IV              (Handball) )   

100

 

3

 

50

 

50

 

100

2
SPEMIE1956 Major Game V              (Yoga)  

100

 

3

 

50

 

50

 

100

2
TOTAL(PRT B) 400   200 200 400 8
              TOTAL ( PART A AND PART B) 700   350 350 700 20

 

M.P.E.S SECOND  SEMESTER

PART COURSE

CODE

TITLE NO. OF TEACHING HOURS DURATION OF EXAM INTERNAL MARKS UNIVERSITY EXAM MARKS TOTAL MARKS CREDITS
 

 

A

SPEMIIC1904 PHYSIOLOGY OF SPORTS & EXERCISE 100 3 50 50 100 4

 

 

SPEMIIC1905 SPORTS TRAINING & TALENT IDENTIFICATION

 

100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIIC1906 HEALTH & FITNESS EDUCATION

 

100 3 50 50 100 4
TOTAL(PRT A) 300   150 150 300 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

B

SPEMIIE1957 GENERAL CONDITIONING & MATCH PRACTISE

 

100 3 50 50 100 2
SPEMIIE1958 Major Game VI               ( Volleyball)

 

100 3 50 50 100 2
SPEMIIE1959 Major Game VII               ( Football)

 

100 3 50 50 100 2
SPEMIIE1960 Major Game VIII

(Tennis)

 

100 3 50 50 100 2
SPEMIIE1961 Major Game IX              ( Softball)

 

100 3 50 50 100 2
SPEMIIE1962 Major Game X            (Kabaddi)

 

100 3

 

50 50 100 2
TOTAL(PRT B) 400   200 200 400 8

 

TOTAL ( PART A AND PART B) 700    350 350 700 20

 

 

M.P.E.S THIRD SEMESTER

PART COURSE

CODE

TITLE NO. OF TEAC-HING HOURS DURAT-ION OF EXAM INTER-NAL MARKS UNIV-ERSITY EXAM MARKS TOTAL MARKS CREDITS
 

 

 

 

 

A

 

 

 

 

SPEMIIIC1907 EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIIIC1908 SPORTS BIOMECHANICS 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIIIC1909 EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION & PROGRAMME DESIGN 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIIIC1910 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(BASKETBALL/ JUDO)

100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIIIC1911 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(FOOTBALL/CRICKET)

100 3 50 50 100 4
TOTAL(PRT A) 500   250 250 500 20
 

 

B

SPEMIIIE1963 ADVANCED COACHING ABILITY & OFFICATING

 ( ANY ONE FROM BASKETBALL / JUDO/ FOOTBALL/ CRICKET)

100 3 50 50 100 2
TOTAL(PRT B) 100   50 50 100 2
TOTAL ( PART A AND PART B) 600   300 300 600 22

 

M.P.E.S FOURTH SEMESTER

PART COURSE

CODE

TITLE NO. OF TEAC-HING HOURS DURATION OF EXAM INTER-NAL MARKS UNIVE-RSITY EXAM MARKS TOTAL MARKS CREDITS
 

 

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPEMIVC1912 SPORTS MEDICINE 100 3 50 50 100 4

 

SPEMIVC1913 PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION & CURRICULUM DESIGN IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIVC1914 THESIS/ DISSERTATION 100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIVC1915 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(BASKETBALL/ JUDO)

100 3 50 50 100 4
SPEMIVC1916 SPORTS SPECIALIZATION

(FOOTBALL/CRICKET)

100

 

3 50 50 100 4
TOTAL(PRT A) 500   250 250 500 20
 

 

B

SPEMIVE1964 ADVANCED COACHING ABILITY & OFFICATING

 ( ANY ONE FORM BASKETBALL / JUDO/ FOOTBALL/CRICKET)

100 3 50 50 100 2
TOTAL(PRT B) 100   50 50 100 2
TOTAL ( PART A AND PART B) 600   300 300 600 22

 

  1. MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION AND EXAMINATION : The medium of instruction and examination shall be English.

COURSE OF STUDY FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS V (M P E.S.)

 

PAPER-I (SPEMIC101)

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND STATISTICS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Module– I

Unit 1 Meaning of research: Need and importance of research

Unit 2 Scope of research in Physical Education

Unit 3 Types of research.

Unit 4 Inter-disciplinary approach;

Module- II

Unit 1 Research problem: Formulation and location of the problem

Unit 2 Criteria for selection of problem

Unit 3 Defining and delimiting problem

Unit 4 Preparation of a Research proposal

Unit 5 Formulation of hypothesis

Unit 6 Library search; Library sources

Unit 7 Preparation of research report, writing styles, format and technical standards, Bibliography and Abstracts.

Module- III

Unit 1 Descriptive Research; Survey, its importance

Unit 2 Tools of surveys such as questionnaires, interviews etc.

Unit 3 Case studies; definition, importance, characteristics, data collection

Unit 4 Philosophical research, brief discussion on methodology and tools.

Unit 5 Historical Research method; Scope in Physical Education, Historical data, Historical criticism.

Module- IV

Unit 1 Experimental Research; Meaning Scope and nature

Unit 2 Experimental and control groups.

Unit 3 Experimental designs.

Module- V

Unit 1 Statistics, definition, Types of statistics and their uses in Physical Education

Unit 2 Quantitative Data, Frequency distribution,

Unit 3 Measures of central tendency, Measures of variability and Percentiles.

Unit 4 Normal curve, definition, properties and principles, uses and application.

Unit 5 Divergence from normality; Skewness & Kurtosis.

Unit 6 Scoring Scales Z, T, 6 Sigma and Hull scale.

Module- VI

Unit 1 Statistical inference; Meaning of reliability factors affecting reliability.

Unit 2 Differences between statistical and Null Hypothesis

Unit 3 Standard error, Type-I and II errors, one tail and two tail tests

Unit 4 Sampling: Simple, stratified and random samples. Coefficient of variation and Sampling error.

Unit 5 Testing of hypothesis, level of significance, Degrees of freedom, standard procedure of systematizing hypothesis

Unit 6 t-ratio Independent group, dependent group.

 

Module- VII

Unit 1 Analysis of variance; with equal and unequal groups, Post-Hoc Tests.

Unit 2 Correlation; its uses and interpretation, Pearson’s Product moment correlation, Spearman Rank difference Correlation, Partial and Multiple correlation

Module- VIII

Unit 1 Computer application in research

Unit 2 Introduction to computers

Unit 3 SPSS

 

REFERENCES 1. Ahuja, Ram. Research methods, Jaipur: Rawat Publications. 2001.

  1. Balagurusamy.E. Computer Oriented Statistical and Numerical Methods, New Delhi: Macmillan India Ltd. 1988.
  2. Best, John W and Kahn, James V. Research in Education, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India,1993.
  3. Borse M.N. Handbook of Research Methodologies, Jaipur: Shree Niwas Publishers. 2004.
  4. Chin, Beverly Ann. How to Write a Great Research Paper, New Jersey: John Willey Sons.2004.
  5. Clarke, David H. Clarke, Harrison H. Research Process in Physical Education, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 1984.
  6. Ferguson, George A. Statistical Analysis in Psychology and Education, Singapore: McGrawhill International Book Co. 1985.
  7. Garrett, Henry E and Woodworth, R.S. Statistics in Psychology and Education, Bombay: Vakil & Sons Ltd. India. 1981.
  8. Gibaldi, Joseph. M.L.A Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, New Delhi: EWP ltd. 2000.
  9. Guilford J.P. Fruchter, Benjamin. Fundamental Statistics in Psychology and Education, Singapore: McGraw-hill International Book Co. 1986.
  10. Koul, Lokesh. Methodology of Educational Research, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House. 2002. 12. Lal, Bindrawan. Research Methodology, Jaipur: A.B.D Publications. 2002.
  11. Lehman, Richard S. Statistics and Research Design in the Behavioral Science, California: Wadsworth Publishing Co. 1991.
  12. Mendenhall, Ott. Understanding Statistics, California: Wadsworth Publishing Co. 1976.
  13. Ntoumanis, Nikos. A. Step- by- Step Guide to SPSS for sport and Exercise Studies, London: Routledge. 2001.
  14. Prakash Verma. J. A. Textbook on Sports Statistics, Gwalior: Venus Publication. 2000
  15. Rotastein Anne.L. Research Design and Statistics for Physical Education, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 1985.
  16. Sadhu A.N. Singh Amarjith. Research Methodology in Social Sciences, Bombay: Himalaya Publishing House. 1988.
  17. Sharma T.R. How to Write a Thesis?, Patiala Kalia Prakashan: Model Town. 1991.
  18. Shaw, Dhananjoy and Ashu. Research Methodologies in Physical Education, Sports and Exercise Science, New Delhi, Khel Sahitya Kendra. 2001.
  19. Sprinthall, Richard C, Schmutte, Gregory, Sirois Le. Understanding Educational Research, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 1991.
  20. Thomas, Terry and Nelson, Jack. K. Research methods in Physical activity, New York: Human Kinetics. 2001.
  21. Veit, Richard C. Research- The Student’s Guide, New York: Macmillan Publishing Co.1990.
  22. Walpole, Ronald E. Introduction to Statistics, New York: Macmillan Publishing C. 1993

 

PAPER-II (SPEMIC102)

MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Module- I

Unit 1 Measurement and evaluation: Introduction and historical background

Unit 2 Importance of measurement & Evaluation in Education and Physical Education

Unit 3 General principles of evaluation

Unit 4 Evaluation and the instructional process of information gathering and decision making.

Module- II

Unit 1 Evaluation procedures: Organizing data and reporting the results of measurement

Unit 2 Accountability and evaluation programme

Unit 3 Tools and techniques of evaluation, Test in evaluation; Innovations in educational evaluation.

Unit 4 Recommendations of various commissions and committees

Unit 5 Public concern and future trends in evaluation.

Module- III

Unit 1 Test Evaluation: Selection of test: Criteria of test selection – Validity, Reliability, Objectivity, norms, Administrative feasibility& Educational application.

Unit 2 Classification of test – Cognitive test, Affective test, Psychomotor &sports skills test

Unit 3 Construction of test knowledge and skill tests

Unit 4 Procedure for administering test- Advance preparation, During testing and after testing.

Module- IV

Unit 1 Measurement of strength, organic functions, motor fitness and general motor ability.

Unit 2 Test for strength-Roger’s physical fitness index and suggested changes in the P.F.I. Test. Cable tension strength battery.

Unit 3 Organic functions-Types of cardio vascular test, Cooper’s Aerobic test with variations, Tutle Pulse ratio test, Harward step test and its modifications (High School and college level-men and women)

Unit 4 Motor fitness- Fleishman Test, Oregon Motor Fitness Test, AAHPER Health related physical fitness test, YMCA physical fitness test battery.

Unit 5 General motor ability: Barrow motor ability test (men) Scott Motor ability test (women)

Module- V

Unit 1 Tests of specific sports skills- Badminton -Miller Volley Test, French short serve test, GSC Badminton Clearance Test, Basketball- Knox test, AAHPER Basketball test for boys and girls, Field Hockey- Henry –Friedel Hockey Test, Champion Ball Control test. Soccer McDonald soccer test Tennis-Dyer Tennis Test; “Wisconsin wall Test for serve. Volleyball AAHPER Volleyball test, Hellmann Volleyball test.

Module- VI

Unit 1 Measures of posture, anthropometry, social efficiency and Psychological factors

Unit 2 Measures of Posture-New York State Posture Rating Test.

Unit 3 Anthropometric measurements; Girth measurements-upper arm, forearm, calf, chest. Width measurements-Biacromial, chest, illocrestal, Biepicondylar (Femur and humerus) Height measurements- stature and sitting height, Leg length, arm length etc. Somatotypes- Heath and Carter Somatotype.

Module- VII

Unit 1 Grading and rating scales: Purposes

Unit 2 Criteria for grades and methods of grading

Unit 3 Rules for use of ratings, types of rating devices.

REFERENCES

  1. ACSM’s Health/Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines, New York: Human Kinetics.1992.
  2. Barrow, Harold M and McGee, Rosemary. A Practical Approach to Measurement in Physical Education, Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger. 1979.
  3. Baumgartner and Jackson. Measurement for Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science, Dubuque: Wm. C. Brown. 1991.
  4. Best, W. John. Research in Education, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 1993.
  5. Bosco, James. S. Measurement and evaluation in physical education fitness and sports. New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 1983.
  6. Clake, H. Harrison. Application of Measurement to Health and Physical Education, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 1976.
  7. Golding, A. Lawrence. YMCA Fitness Testing and Assessment Manual, New York:Human Kinetics. 2000.
  8. Heyward, Vivian H. and Wagner, Dale R. Applied Body Composition Assessment, New York: Human Kinetics. 2004.
  9. Mathews, Donald. K. Measurement in Physical Education, London: W. Saunders Co. 1985.
  10. Principles of YMCA Health and Fitness, YMCA. 1995.
  11. Safrit, Margaret J. Introduction to Measurement in physical education and exercise science, St. Louis: Mosby. 1995.

 

PAPER-III(SPEMIC103)

SPORTS MANAGEMENT

Module- I

Unit 1 Meaning of management, functions of management, (planning, organizing, controlling, leading, evaluation)

Unit 2 Skills of management (technical skill, human skill, conceptual skill)

Unit 3 Role of manager (interpersonal roles, informational roles, decision roles).

Unit 4 Theories and styles of Management.

Unit 5 Management and administration; Scope and problems of sports management

Module- II

Unit 1 Organizations: Attributers of an organization; formal and informal, private and public sector organizations

Unit 2 Organizational set up of clubs; sport associations, Sports Authority of India, Department of sports and Youth affairs (Centre & State)

Unit 3 School and University Department of sports and Association of Indian Universities.

Module- III

Unit 1 Planning: Steps in the process of planning (setting up of objectives, identification of constraints, generation of alternatives)

Unit 2 Perspectives of planning and future projections

Unit 3 Planning and budgeting

Unit 4 Planning sports facilities (out door and indoor).

Unit 5 Program planning; (normal and special population)

Unit 6 Social and economic parameters in planning.

Module- IV

Unit 1 Office management; Personnel management, human resource management, Financial management

Unit 2 Man power requirement planning, organization, development, recruitment and placement

Unit 3 Monitoring performance of physical education personnel; behavioural audit; human relations

Unit 4 Communication in personal management; public relations.

Module- V

Unit 1 Material Management: Identification and classification of sports materials/equipments (consumable and non consumable).

Unit 2 Modification, standardization and modernization of equipments

Unit 3 Storing material and inventory control; procedures of maintaining, preserving and conserving materials, security measures

Unit 4 Principles and procedures of procuring sport material.

Module- VI

Unit 1 Organization of sports events (Intramurals and extramural)

Unit 2 Writing of circulars, notifications and invitations

Unit 3 Publicity, fund raising, selecting and fixing of officials

Unit 4 Monitoring and write-up

Unit 5 Press, sponsoring teams, writing reports and maintaining records.

Module- VII

Unit 1 Supervision- scope and importance of supervision in Physical Education

Unit 2 Role of the supervisor in office and field management

Unit 3 Supervisory styles, qualities of supervisor

Unit 4 Supervisory techniques- visitations, meetings; discussion

Unit 5 Evaluating the effectiveness of the organization.

REFERENCES

  1. Bucher Charles A. Management of Physical Education and Athletic Programmes, St. Louis: Times Mirror. 1987.
  2. Chelladurai P. Sport Management- Macro Perspectives, London: Sports Dynamics. 1985. 3. Dheer. S. and Kamal Radhika. Organisation and Administration of Physical Education, New Delhi: Friends Publications. 1991.
  3. Frost, Reuben B., Lockart and Marshall, Stanely J. Administration of Physical Education and Athletics. Iowa: Wm.C. Brown. 1988.
  4. Horine, Larry. Administration of Physical Education and Sport Programmes, New York: Wm. C. Brown. 1991.
  5. Manson. James G. and Paul Jim. Modern Sports Administration, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 1988.
  6. Tripathi. P.C. and Reddy P.N. Principles of Management, New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill. 1991.
  7. Vander Zwaag Harold J. Sport Management in Schools and Colleges, New York: Macmillan. 1985.
  8. Zeigler, Earle F. and Browie Gary W. Management Competency Development in Sports and Physical Education, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger. 1983.

 

PAPER-IV (SPEMIIC104)

PHYSIOLOGY OF SPORTS AND EXERCISE

Module- -I

Unit 1 Introduction: Definition of Physiology and Exercise Physiology

Unit 2 Role of Exercise Physiology in the field of Physical Education and Sports.

Unit 3 Muscle: Structure and Function.

Unit 4 Types of muscles (voluntary, involuntary and cardiac)

Unit 5 Chemical composition of skeletal muscle

Unit 6 Muscle fibre type (Red and white muscle).

Unit 7 Mechanism of muscular contraction.

Module- -II

Unit 1 Bioenergetics: Fuel for muscular work, (ATP), Energy of muscular contraction and biochemical changes during muscular contraction. Heat production and thermodynamics of muscle contraction. Aerobic and anaerobic muscular activity.

Unit 2 Neuro- muscular junction and coordination of muscular activity: Neuron and motor unit transmission of nerve impulse, bio-electric potentials, neuro-muscular junction and transmission of nerve impulse across it.

Unit 3 Pro-prioception and Kinesthesis, Tone, Posture and equilibrium.

Module- -III

Unit 1 Physiological changes due to exercise: Immediate effect of exercise/work on various systems of body; cardio-respiratory, muscular and thermo-regulatory systems.

Unit 2 Effect of exercise and training on (i) heart and circulatory systems, (ii) respiratory systems, (iii) brief discussion of other systems during rest, sub-maximal and maximal work. Unit 3 Oxygen debt, forced expiratory volume, breathing capacity, recovery rate, blood supply to skeletal muscle and regulation of blood flow during exercise.

Unit 4 Other physiological aspects of exercise and sports: Concept of physical fitness; components of fitness and health related fitness. Wellness and concepts of Physical training, warming up, conditioning and fatigue.

Unit 5 Physiological aspect of development of strength, endurance, skill, speed, agility and coordination.

Module- -IV

Unit 1 Basic concept of a balanced diet: Appropriate diet before, during and after athletic performance

Unit 2 Nutritional aspects of athletic performance and the effect of alcohol, drugs and smoking on athletic performance.

Unit 3 Energy cost of various sports activity: Definition of energy cost, energy cost of various sports activities and various direct /indirect methods of assessing them.

Module–V

Unit 1 Work and Environment

Unit 2 Obesity and weight control, Definition of obesity, measurement of body fat by various methods (under water weighing and skin fold measurement). Body weight control. Positive and negative balance.

Unit 3 Work capacity under different environmental conditions: hot, humid, cold and high altitude.

REFERENCES

  1. Burne G. M. The Structure and Function of Muscle, Academic Press: London. 1972.
  2. De Vries, H. A. Physiology of Exercise for Physical Education and Athletics, Stapes Press:London. 1976.
  3. Fox, Edward L. et. al. The Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics, Wm. C.Brown Publishers. 1989. 3. Guyton A. C. Text book of Medical Physiology, W. B. Saunders Co: Philadelphia. 1971.
  4. Mathew D.K. and Fox E. L. Physiological Basis of Physical Education and Athletics, W. B.Saunders Co: Philadelphia, 1971.
  5. Morehouse L. E. and Miller A. T. Physiology of Exercise, C. V. Mosby Co: St. Louis. 1976.
  6. Moses, Amrit Kumar. R. Introduction to Exercise Physiology, Poom Pugar Pathippagam: Chennai. 1995.
  7. P.O. Astran and K. Rodahi. Textbook of Work Physiology, New York: Mc.Graw HillLtd.1970.

 

 

PAPER-V (SPEMIIC105)

SPORTS TRAINING AND TALENT IDENTIFICATION

Module -I

SPORTS TRAINING

Unit 1 Importance and definition of sports training

Unit 2 Aim and objectives of sports training

Unit 3 Characteristics of sports training

Unit 4 Principles of sports Training

TRAINING LOAD, ADAPTATION AND RECOVERY

Unit 5 Concept of load and Adaptation

Unit 6 Relationship of load and recovery, physiotherapeutic and psychological means of Recovery 1.7 Variables of Training: Volume, Intensity, Density, Complexity

Unit 8 Relationship between volume and intensity

Unit 9 Fatigue and overtraining: monitoring treating, and preventing overtraining.

TRAINING METHODS

Unit 10 Interval training method

Unit 11 Repetition training method

Unit 12 Continuous training method

Unit 13 Circuit training method

Unit 14 Fartlek training method

Unit 15 Weight training method

Unit 16 Resistance training method

Unit 17 Plyometric method

 

Module II

BIO-MOTOR ABILITIES AND THEIR DEVELOPMENT STRENGTH AND POWER DEVELOPMENT

Unit 1 Types of strength

Unit 2 Factors affecting strength performance

Unit 3 Methods of strength training: training maximum strength; explosive strength and Strength endurance

ENDURANCE TRAINING

Unit 4 Definition, Types and significance of endurance

Unit 5 Factors affecting endurance

Unit 6 Training Parameters for Aerobic and Anaerobic Endurance

Unit 7 Methods to develop endurance SPEED TRAINING

Unit 8 Definition, Forms of speed

Unit 9 Factors determining speed

Unit 10 Load parameters to develop speed

Unit 11 Methods to develop speed abilities

FLEXIBILITY TRAINING

Unit 12 Definition, Types of flexibility and Factors affecting flexibility;

Unit 13 Methods used to develop flexibility

COORDINATION TRAINING

Unit 14 Definition, Classification of coordinative abilities

Unit 15 Factors affecting coordination and Methods to develop coordination

Module III

TECHNICAL AND TACTICAL PREPARATION

Unit 1 Definition and meaning of technique, skill and style

Unit 2 Technique training & its implication in various phases; methods employed for

Unit 3 Technique training, causes of technical fault and their correction

Unit 4 Definition and meaning of tactics, aim of tactics according to sport

Unit 5 Training for tactics

Unit 6 Principles of tactical preparation

Module IV

PERIODIZATION TRAINING

Planning

Unit 1 Need and importance in planning

Unit 2 Principles of planning

Unit 3 Types of plan (training conception, macro, micro, meso and training session plan) Annual training programme

Unit 4 Periodization, psychological super compensation

Unit 5 Periodization of strength training, speed and endurance

Unit 6 Annual plan Training Phases and characteristics

Unit 7 Criteria for compiling an annual plan

Unit 8 Peaking for Competitions, Factors facilitating peaking

Module V

LONG TERM PLANNING AND TALENT IDENTIFICATION

Unit 1 Stages of Athletic Development: Generalized and Specialized training

Unit 2 Olympic Cycle: classification of Olympic cycle plan and compiling an Olympic cycle plan

Unit 3 Talent Identification: Methods, Criteria, Factors and Phases of Talent Identification.

PRACTICAL

1 Designing & formulation of macro/micro/meso/training session plans.

2 Assignment: Scheduled Preparation: long term and short term

3 Monitoring of Intensity in interval training by using different methods

4 Demonstration of Preparatory, auxiliary and supplementary exercises for different

5 Setting-up of circuit training stations

REFERENCES

  1. Annette, Lang. Morning Strength Workouts. Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ilc, USA, 2007. 2. B. Don, Frnak, Edward J. Howley (1995), “Fitness Leaders Handbook”. (Human Kinetics). 3. Claude Bouchard, Roy J. Shephard, Thomas Stephens (1993), “Physical Activity, Fitness and Health Consensus Statement” (Human Kinetics Publishers).
  2. Craig A. Wrisberg. Sports Skill Instruction for Coaches. Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ilc, USA,2007.
  3. Cratty, B. Perceptual and Motor Development in Infants and Children. Prentice Hall, 1989. 6. Daniel, D. Arnheim & William E.Prentice “Principles of Sports Training” Morby- Year Book Inc.St. Louis, 1993.
  4. David N. Camaione (1993), “Fitness Management”: (Wels Brown & Benlr Mark).

8.Donald, Chu. Jumping Into Plyo metrics. Human Kinetics, Champaign, ILL, 1998.

  1. Hardayal Singh, Science of Sports Training, ND: D.A.V. Pub., 1993.
  2. Herre, D., Principals of Sports Training, London: Grafion Book, 1982.
  3. Hoeger (2005). “Principles and Labs in Fitness & Wellness”
  4. Jenson, C.R. Fisher, A.G. Scientific Basic of Athletic Conditioning, Lea and Febiger, Philadephia,1992.
  5. Jones, J. Jones, Wells, L. Jannet, Peters, Rachael E., Johnson, Dewayne J., Effective Coaching (Principles & Practice). Allyn &Bacon, Massachusetts, USA, 1982.
  6. Lee, E.brown & Vance A.Ferrigna. (editors). Training for speed, Agility and Quickness, HumanKinetics, Champaign,Ilc.,USA,2005.
  7. Matveyew, L.P. Fundamentals of Sports Training (Translation from Russian) Mir. Publisers,Moscow, 1991.
  8. Novich, Max M. & Taylor, Buddy Training Conditioning of Athletes. Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia,1983.
  9. Uppal, A.K. and Gautam, Principles of Sports Training, Delhi: Friends, 2001.

 

PAPER-VI (SPEMIIC106)

HEALTH AND FITNESS EDUCATION

Module–I

Unit1 Introduction to health: Modern concepts of health, meaning and definition of health

Unit 2 Basic dimensions of health- physical health, mental health and spiritual health

Unit 3 Means to aid man in achieving his health potential

Unit 4 Individuals’ adaptation of healthy life styles.

Module–II

Unit 1 Concept of fitness: Meaning, scope, nature, need and types of fitness.

Unit 2 Components of fitness

Unit 3 Methods of developing (components) fitness

Unit 4 Fitness for different age groups, fitness for disabled.

Unit 5 Means for developing fitness- aerobic and anaerobic exercises

Unit 6 Functional fitness, and integration of activities with daily routine.

Module–III

Unit 1 Physical activity in life cycle and disease: Exercise and life cycle

Unit 2 Physiological age, life long fitness, exercise and physiological aging

Unit 3 Risk of exercise for the elderly people

Unit 4 Exercise and chronic diseases- osteoporosis, hypertension, diabetics, bronchitis, coronary heart and pulmonary diseases.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Biochemical aspects of physical fitness: Energy metabolism and fatigue in working muscles

Unit 2 Metabolic aspects of fatigue

Unit 3 Exercise and nutrition, digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, water and electrolyte.

Unit 4 Caloric requirements of diet for different age groups and life styles

Unit 5 Relationship between diet and diseases, therapeutic diets, community nutrition.

Module–V

Unit 1 Management of health and fitness centres: Management theories applicable to health and fitness centres, modern trends and responsibilities of manager.

Unit 2 Organizational structure of health and fitness centres; Government, Private, autonomous, educational, industrial, hotel and tourism.

Unit 3 Human resource management, public relationship, financial management, budgetary process, financial sources, material management

Unit 4 Principles and guidelines for facility planning, special infrastructure for health and fitness centres

Unit 5 Health and fitness marketing management

Unit 6 Health and fitness programmes for children, adult, women and old age people.

Unit 7 Care and safety of health and fitness equipments.

Module–VI

Unit 1 Assessment and evaluation of health and fitness: Assessment of functional abilities (Heart and Lung functions)

Unit 2 Physiological testing-Aerobic and anaerobic endurance

Unit 3 Health -related physical fitness tests.

REFERENCES

  1. Anspaugh, David J. et.al. Wellness- Concepts and Applications, St. Louis: Mosby. 1997.
  2. Brooks, Douglas S. The Complete Book of Personal Training, New York: Human Kinetics.2004.
  3. Corbin, Charles B. et.al. Concepts of Fitness and Wellness, Boston: McGraw Hill. 2000.
  4. Decker, June and Mize, Monica. Walking Games and Activities, New York: Human Kinetics.2002.
  5. Donatelle, Rebecca J. and Davis, Lorraine G. access to Health, Bacon: Allyn and Bacon. 1998.
  6. Gibney, Michael et al. Public Health Nutrition, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. 2005.
  7. Griffin, John C. Client Cantered Exercise Prescription, New York: Human Kinetics. 1998. 8. Hardman Adrianne E. and Stensel, David J. Physical Activity and Health, London: Routledge.2004.
  8. Hoeger, Werner W.K. and Hoeger, Sharon A. Fitness and Wellness, Colorado: Morton Publishing Company. 1990.
  9. McPherson, Barry D. et.al. The Social Significance of Sport, New York: Human Kinetics.1989.
  10. Park K. Preventive and Social Medicine, Jabalpur: Banarsidas Bhanot Publishers. 2002. Prentice, William. Fitness for College and Life, St. Louis: Mosby. 1994.
  11. Wiliams, Melvin H. Lifetime Fitness and Wellness, Wm. C. Brown Publishers. 1990.

PAPER-VII (SPEMIIIC107)

SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY

Module–I

Unit 1 Meaning, nature and scope of sport psychology

Unit 2 Development of sports psychology

Unit 3 Relationship of sports psychology with other sport sciences.

Unit 4 Importance of sports psychology in the field of physical education and sports.

Module–II

Unit 1 Cognitive process in physical activities: Meaning of cognition, characteristics of cognitive process in sports

Unit 2 Role of sensation and perception, thinking imagination and memory in physical activities.

Unit 3 Mental activity of athletes, mental activity and sports related goals.

Unit 4 Meaning of attention, dimensions of attention, strategies to develop attention.

Unit 5 Motor Learning: Meaning of motor learning, factors affecting motor learning, motor development in various periods of childhood and adolescence.

Module–III

Unit 1 Personality: Meaning of personality, personality traits of sports person, relationship of personality to sport performance. Personality differences among various sports groups.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Motivation: Meaning of motive, need, drive, role of motives, attitudes and interest in physical activities.

Unit 2 Meaning of motivation, techniques of motivation, types of motivation, relationship between extrinsic and intrinsic motivation.

Unit 3 Emotions: Meaning and types of emotion, influence of emotions (success and failure) on level of aspiration and achievement.

Unit 4 Aggression, Anxiety, fear, frustration, conflict and its effect on sports performance.

Module–V

Unit 1 Psychological aspects of competition: Defining competition, determinants of competitive behaviour, psychological characteristics of pre-competition, competition and post competition

Unit 2 Selected psycho-regulative techniques for relaxation and activation.

Unit 3 Psychological aspects of long -term and short-term preparation for competition.

Unit 4 Psychological treatment of injured sports person, typical responses to injuries, prevention and coping techniques.

Unit 5 Special Facilitation: Presence of others, cohesion, effect of audience in sports Competitions.

Unit 6 Methods of investigation and testing in sports psychology. Test & Measurement

REFERENCES

  1. Alderman, R. S. Psychological Behaviour in sports, Philaedlphia, London: Saunders Co.1974.
  2. Allen, Bem P. Personality Theories, Boston: Allyn and Bacon. 2000.
  3. Butt Dorce Susan, Psychology of Sports. New York.
  4. Cratty Bryant, J. Movement Behaviour and Motor Learning. Philadelphia Lea & Febiger1975.
  5. Cratty Bryant, J. Psychology of contemporary Sports. Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Prentice Hall Inc. 1975.
  6. Cratty Bryant, J. Psychology and Physical Activity, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Prentice Hall Inc. 1965.
  7. Cratty Bryant, J. Psychological preparation & Athletic Excellence. New York: Movement Publications Inc. 1978
  8. Gold Stein, Joffrey. H. Sport Games & Play Social & Psychological view points, Lawrence Brlhum Associates, Publishers X. J. 1979.
  9. Kamlesh, M. L. Psychology of Physical Education and Sports. Metropolitan Book Co. Pvt. Ltd. 1983.
  10. Kane. J. E. Psychological aspect of Physical Education and Sports. London: Roatwge and Kega Paul 1972.
  11. Lbwolhyn Jack. K. Blucket Jolley, A Psychology of coaching theory and application.
  12. Martens Rainer, Social Psychology and Physical Activity, New York. Harper &Row Publishers.1975.
  13. Singer Robert N. Sustaining Motivation in Sports. Consultants International, Tallehese Florida Sports Consultants International Inc. 1975.
  14. Singer Robert N. Motor Learning and Human Performance, New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. 1975.
  15. Singer Robert N. Coaching Athletic and Psychology, New York McGraw Hills Book Co. 1972.
  16. Roberts Glyn C. Learning Experiences in Sport Psychology. New York: Human Kinetics Publishers Inc. 1986.
  17. Martens Rainer Coaching Guide Sports Psychology, New York: Human Kinetics Publishers Inc. 1987.
  18. Linda K. Binket J. Ratella & Ann. S. Really, Sports Psychology and Psychological Considerations in maximizing Sport Performance. Jowa: Wc. Brown Publishers. 1987.
  19. Diane L. Gill. Psychological Dynamics of Sport. New York: Human Kinetics Publishers Inc. 1986.
  20. Anderson, Mark. B, Doing Sport Psychology. New York, Human Kinetics, 2000. Hanin, Yuri. L, Emotions in Sport. New York. Human Kinetics, 2000

PAPER-VIII (SPEMIIIC108)

SPORTS BIOMECHANICS

Module–I

Unit 1 Introduction: Meaning of biomechanics

Unit 2 Biomechanics in Physical Education

Unit 3 Sports and research.

Unit 4 Movement analysis, mechanical analysis and biomechanical analysis.

Module–II

Unit 1 Motion; Linear and angular motion

Unit 2 Distance and displacement (linear and angular)

Unit 3 Speed, velocity, acceleration and uniform motion.

Unit 4 Newton’s laws of motion as applicable to linear and angular motion and their application to sports and games.

Unit 5 Projectile motion and its application in sports and games.

Module–III

Unit 1 Force: Meaning, Units of force, effects of force, sources of force, components and resultant of force , friction, pressure.

Unit 2 Centrifugal and centripetal forces.

Unit 3 Work, power & energy.

Unit 4 Moment of force, moment of inertia

Unit 5 Levers; its types and characteristics.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Freely falling bodies, momentum and impulse.

Unit 2 Centre of Gravity, Equilibrium, Stability (static and dynamic)

Unit 3 Spin, effect of spin, elasticity.

Unit 4 Fluid mechanics. Air resistance and water resistance.

Module–V

Unit 1 Analysis of fundamental skills: Walking, running, jumping, throwing, lifting, pulling, pushing, catching, hitting and climbing.

Unit 2 Analysis of skills of the following sports and games: Athletics, Basketball, Cricket., Gymnastics, Football, Hockey ,Tennis and Volleyball

REFERENCES

  1. Bartlett, Roger. Introduction to Sports Biomechanics, London: E & FN Spon. 1997.
  2. Carr, Gerry. Sports Mechanics for Coaches, New York: Human Kinetics. 2004.
  3. Gladys, Scott M. Kinesiology, New Delhi: Sports Publications. 1998.
  4. Hamilton, Nancy and Luttgens, Kathryn. Kinesiology, Boston: McGraw Hill. 2002.
  5. Kreighbaum, Ellen and Barthels, Katharine M. Biomechanics, London: Allyn and Bacon. 1996.
  6. Robertson .E Gordon D et. al. Research Methods in Biomechanics. New York: Human Kinetics. 2004.
  7. Shaw, Dhananjoy. Mechanical Basis of Biomechanics, New Delhi: Sports Publications. 2000.

 

PAPER-IX (SPEMIIIC109)

EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION AND PROGRAMME DESIGNING

 

Module- I

Unit 1. Introduction and Overview – Risks and benefits of exercise, Physical Activity, Health, and Hypo kinetic Disease,

Unit 2. Preliminary Health Screening and Risk Classification- Health evaluation, Lifestyle evaluation, Informed consent.

Unit 3. Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q).

Unit 4. Assessment of Physical Activity

Unit 5. Assessment of Nutritional Status

 

Module- II

Unit 1. Principles of Prescription and Exercise Adherence – Basic principles for exercise program design,

Unit 2. Components of an exercise program (frequency, intensity, duration, and mode),

Unit 3. Principles of training,

Unit 4. Components of fitness,

Unit 5. The art and science of exercise prescription (safety and effectiveness),

Unit 6. Exercise program adherence, Certification and licensure.

Module- III

Unit 1. Designing Cardio- respiratory Exercise Programs – The exercise prescription,

Unit 2. Essentials of a cardio- respiratory exercise workout, Aerobic training methods and modes, personalized exercise programs.

Unit 3. Designing Resistance Training Programs – Types of resistance training, Comparison of resistance training methods

Unit 4. Developing a resistance training program,

Unit 5. Common misconceptions and questions about resistance training.

Module-  IV

Unit 1. Designing Body Composition Programs – Basics of body composition, Body composition management principles and practices,

Unit 2. Fat mass programs, Muscle mass programs, Bone mass programs.

Unit 3. Designing Flexibility Programs – Stretching, Low back care.

Unit 4. Designing weight management and body composition programmes.

Unit 5. Design weight loss and weight gain programmes. Positive, Negative and Neutral Energy Balances.

Module-  V

Unit 1. Programming for Special Populations – Cardiac patients, pulmonary patients,

Unit 2. Programming for Special Populations Clinical conditions: Hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and obesity

Unit 3. Programming for Special Populations Children, the elderly, and pregnancy.

Unit 4. Programming in Professional Settings – Clinical settings, Community settings, corporate settings, Commercial settings.

Unit 5. Obesity, Types, Causes and Preventive measures.

REFERENCES:

  1. Heyward, V.H. (2010). Advanced Fitness Assessment & Exercise Prescription. 6th ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
  2. American College of Sports Medicine (2010). ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. 8th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
  3. American College of Sports Medicine (2010). ACSM’s Resource Manual for Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. 5th ed. Baltimore, MD., Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

PAPER-X (SPEMIVC110)

SPORTS MEDICINE

Module–I

Unit 1 Introduction: Review of structure and function of various systems.

Module–II

Unit 1 Types of injuries in sports:

Unit 2 Skin injuries: Abrasions, lacerations, Incisions, puncture wounds, blisters, sunburn.

Unit 3 Bone injuries: Fractures, Dislocations.

Unit 4 Soft tissue injuries: Contusions, strains, sprains, overuse injuries.

Module–III

Unit 1 General principles of management of: Cardiopulmonary emergencies, head and neck injuries, shock, internal injuries, superficial bleeding, fractures, dislocations.

Unit 2 Muscle and Tendon injuries, ligament injuries.

Unit 3 Prevention of sports injuries.

Unit 4 First aid in sports injuries.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Therapeutic modalities in sports medicine: Physiological effects of heat and cold.

Unit 2 Brief description of procedure, indications and contraindications of infrared, paraffin wax, contrast bath, Whirlpool, short wave diathermy, ultrasound, ice.

Module–V

Unit 1 Brief understanding of the following regional injuries, their assessment, immediate management and rehabilitation: Head injuries types: Scalp injuries, concussion, fracture, intra cranial bleeding, on field evaluation and management of unconscious athlete.

Unit 2 Shoulder girdle injuries: Fracture Clavicle, Acromo clavicular joint sprain.

Unit 3 Shoulder joint: Dislocations, rehabilitation of dislocated shoulder, impingement syndrome.

Unit 4 Elbow: Tennis elbow- rehabilitation.

Unit 5 Spine injuries: On field evaluation, transportation of spine injured athletes.

Unit 6 Low back pain: Prevention of low backache. Brief understanding of rehabilitation

Unit 7 Knee: Types of knee injuries, Brief understanding of rehabilitation after dislocation patella and internal derangement knee.

Unit 8 Thigh injuries: Quadriceps contusion, strain hamstring strain rehabilitation.

Unit 9 Leg-ankle: Causes of shin pain, Achilles tendonitis, ankle sprains, rehabilitation of sprained ankle.

 

Module–VI

Unit 1 Thermal injuries: Prevention and management of heat cramps, heat fatigue, heat exhaustion, heat stroke.

Module–VII

Unit 1 Brief understanding of the special problems of the female athletes.

Module–VIII

Unit 1 Nutrition for the athlete, proximate principles of diet, pre-game meal, sugar & fluid intake during competition, carbohydrate loading.

Unit 2 Doping: Definition, classification, Hazards and its control.

PRACTICALS

  1. Demonstration of the use of different therapeutic modalities.
  2. Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  3. Emergency bandaging and splinting techniques.
  4. On field evaluation and transportation of the spine injured athlete.

REFERENCES

  1. Roy Steven and Richer Irvin. Sports Medicine, Prentice Hall. 1983.
  2. Kulund Daniel. N. The Injured Athlete, Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. 1988.
  3. BooherJames M. and Thibodeau Gary-A. Athletic Injury Assessment, Toronto: Mosby College Publishing.1985.
  4. Hutson M. A. Sports Injuries, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1996.
  5. Kupria, Werner. Physical Therapy for Sports, Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Com. 1995.
  6. Mellion, Morris B. Sports Injuries and Athletic Problems, New Delhi: Surjeet Publications.1996
  7. Mottram, David R. Drugs in Sports, London: Routledge. 2004.
  8. Norris, Chritopher M. Sports Injuries, Oxford: Butterworth Heinmann. 1997.
  9. Pandey P. K. and Gupta L. C. Outline of Sports Medicine, New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers. 1987.
  10. Pandey P. K. Know How? Sports Medicine, Jalandhar: A. P. Pub. 1985.
  11. Porter, Stuart. Tidy’s Physiotherapy, Oxford: Buterwort-Heinemann. 2003.
  12. Satpathy G.C. Sports Medicine and Exercise Science, New Delhi: Isha Books. 2005.
  13. Sherry, Eugele and Bokor, Des. Sports Medicine, London: GMM Ltd. 1997.
  14. Southmayd, William and Hoffman, Marshall. Sports Health, Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers. 1998.

PAPER-XI

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION AND CURRICULUM DESIGN

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (SPEMIVC111)

Module–I

Unit 1 Foundations of professional preparation: Ideals of Indian democracy-contribution of Physical

Education.

Unit 2 Process and factors affecting educational policies and programmes-social, religious,

economic and political.

Unit 3 The purposes of education and Physical Education.

Unit 4 Role of Central Government in education and professional preparation

Unit 5 Professional associations.

Module–II

Unit 1 Professional preparation in Physical Education: Historical review of Professional preparation

in India.

Unit 2 The concept of Professional leadership and preparation in India.

Unit 3 Professional qualifications and personal qualities of Physical Educators.

Module–III

Unit 1 Undergraduate Preparation of Professional personnel: Purposes of undergraduate

preparation.

Unit 2 Admission procedures.

Unit 3 Curriculum-Field experiences, laboratory experiences, teaching practice, professional

competencies to be developed, facilities and social resources for library.

Unit 4 Post-Graduate Preparation: Purposes of post-graduate studies.

Unit 5 Admission requirements.

Unit 6 Specialization.

Unit 7 Research Experience

Module–IV

Unit 1 Curriculum Designing. The importance of Curriculum Designing

Unit 2 Curriculum patterns-activity bases, movement based, concepts based, developmental need based, student-cantered curriculum patterns.

Unit 3 Role of the teacher in Curriculum Designing.

Unit 4 Principles of Curriculum planning.

Unit 5 Selection of educational activities.

Unit 6 Classification of activities in Physical Education..

Unit 7 Outcome of each class of activity.

Unit 8 Suitability of activities for different age groups and sexes.

Unit 9 Progression in curriculum.

Unit 10 Cultural Influence in the choice of activities.

Unit 11 Flexibility of programme material.

Module–V

Unit 1 Methods of teaching: Command method, practice method, guided discovery and problem-solving.

Unit 2 Grouping of students for instruction.

Unit 3 Time allotment.

Unit 4 Block programme.

Unit 5 Teaching aids.

Unit 6 Provision for individual differences.

Unit 7 Development of programme for different levels. Kindergarten, Elementary school, Middle school, 10+2 school, college and university, special institutions, (technical school, orphans hostel).

Unit 8 Adapted Physical Education.

Module–VI

Unit 1 Co-education in Physical Education:

Unit 2 Integrating the programmes for boys and girls.

Unit 3 Activities suitable for co-educational needs.

Unit 4 Levels at which co-education is desirable.

Unit 5 Special provision for development of girl’s programme.

 

Committee’s Recommendations

NCERT, CBSE, UGC recommendations on curriculum for schools and colleges.

Curriculum for college of Physical Education.

 

REFERENCES

  1. Bucher, Charles. A. and Wuest, Debora. Foundations of Physical Education and Sports, St.

Louis: The C. Mosby Co. 1987.

  1. Dutt, Suresh. Curriculum and Child Development, New Delhi: Anmol Publications. 2004.
  2. Floyd, Patricia and Allen, Beverly. Introduction to Careers in Health, Physical Education

and Sport, Belmont: Wadsworth-Thomson. 2004.

  1. Green, Ken and Hardman Ken. Physical Education-Essential Issues, London: Sage

Publications. 2005.

  1. Harrison, Joyce. M. and Blackemore, Connie. L. Instructional strategies for Secondary School

Physical Education, Dubuque: Wm.C. Brown Publishers. 1989.

  1. Hayes, Sid and Stidder, Gary. Equity and Inclusion in Physical Education and Sport. London:

Routledge. 2003.

  1. Hellison, Donald R and Templin, Thomas J. A Reflective Approach to Teaching Physical

Education, New York: Human Kinetics. 1991.

  1. Jewett, Anne. E. & Bain, Linda. L. The Curriculum process in Physical Education, Dubuque:

Wm.C. Brown Publishers. 1985.

  1. Kamlesh. M. L. Physical Education: Facts and Foundations, Faridabad: P. B. Publications.

1989.

  1. Laker, Anthony. Developing Personal, Social and Moral Education Through Physical

Education, London: Routledge. 2003.

  1. Laker, Anthony. The Future of Physical Education, London: Routledge. 2003.
  2. Vashist S.R. The Theory of Curriculum, New Delhi: Anmol Publications. 2004.
  3. Verghese B.V. Primary School Curriculum, New Delhi: Anmol Publications. 2004.
  4. Voltmer, Edward. F et al. The organization and administration of Physical Education, New

Jersy; Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1979.

  1. Zeigler, Earle. Ed. Physical Education and Sports-An Introduction, Philadelphia: Lea &

Febiger.1982.

PAPER XII(SPEMIVC112)

THESIS 

PART B

ELECTIVE PAPER FOR MAJOR GAMES PRACTICALS , SPORTS SPECIALISATION  & ADVANCED COACHING ABILITY & OFFICIATING

Apart from the practical’s of major games prescribed in the syllabus, students shall have to choose one Major game each in 3rd and 4th semester from the following list for specialization and advanced coaching ability and officiating.

  1. Track and Field 2. Basketball 3. Cricket 4. Football 5. Handball 6. Volleyball 7. Judo

 

PAPER XIII (SPEMIE113)

GENERAL CONDITIONING AND MATCH PRACTICE

PAPER XIV (SPEMIE114)

TRACK AND FIELD

Module-  I

Unit 1 Introduction: History and development of Track and field events

Unit 2 Organizational setup of Track and Field Athletic

Unit 3 Major competitions at National and International levels.

Module-  II

Unit 1 Rules and officiating in Track and field; Principles of officiating

Unit 2 Track and Field lay out and Marking

Module-  III

Unit 1 Fundamental techniques of Track events; Sprint events- Running form, starting and finishing technique

Unit 2 Middle and long distance running

Unit 3 Walking events-walking technique

Unit 4 Hurdles Events- Hurdling technique

Module-  IV

Unit 1 Fundamental techniques of jumping events; Long jump-Mechanics of Jumping Hang style and hitch-kick techniques-Approach run, Take off, action in the air, landing

Unit 2 High jump-Straddle-role and Fosbury techniques

Module–V

Unit 1 Fundamental Technique of Throwing Events-Mechanics of throwing.

Unit 2 The shot put, Initial stance, glide/turn, throwing position, release, recovery.

Unit 3 The discus throw, Technique-initial stance, preliminary swing, the turn, throwing position, release, recovery.

Unit 4 The javelin throw, Technique-the grip, carry, five- stride rhythm, release, recovery.

Unit 5 The hammer throw, Technique- the grip, initial position, preliminary swing, the turn release, and reverse.

Module–VI

Unit 1 Combined Events- Decathlon and Heptathlon- General principles of training for combined events.

Module–VII

Unit 1 Pedagogic Principles of Track And Field Training: a) Periodization of training- preparatory training- build up training- high performance training. b) Training plans- Long term plan, yearly plan, monthly and weekly schedule, day’s programme-physical qualities.

Module–VIII

Unit 1 Training Means and Methods: a) Conditioning, b) Warming up- general and specific. c) Development of physical fitness and motor qualities. d) Specific training for techniques development tactics- effect of training in attitude.

Module–IX

Unit 1 Talent Identification

Unit 2 Training youth athletes and women athletes

Unit 3 Psychological preparation for competition in track and field.

Module–X

Unit 1 Common Injuries in Track And Field during Training and Competitions

Unit 2 Prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

Unit 3 Doping and its control

REFERENCES

  1. Carr, Gerry R. Fundamentals of Track and Field, Mumbai: The Marine Sports. 1995.
  2. Ekta. Teaching and Coaching Athletics, New Delhi: Sports Publication. 2003.
  3. Emmanuel, George. Athletic meet- Marking, Rules, Directions, Cicily George: Kottayam.2001.
  4. Lawson, Gerald. World Record

PAPER XV BASKETBALL (SPEMIE115)

Module–I

Unit 1 History and development of Basketball

Unit 2 Organizational setup of Basketball at national and international level.

Unit 3 Distinguished personalities

Module–II

Unit 1 Rules and officiating the Game – duties of officials

Unit 2 Coach, captain, game observation

Unit 3 Individual and group scouting and statistical analysis of players and matches

Unit 4 Objective and subjective tests.

Module–III

Unit 1 Organizational setup at the International Level-FIBA

Unit 2 Structure of the National Federation.

Module–IV

Unit 1 The Court-Dimensions and Markings

Unit 2 Equipments and its measurement

Unit 3 Teaching Aids

Module–V

Unit 1 Fundamental Skills- Dribbling-Basic and reverse dribbling

Unit 2 Ball Handling- Grip, Pivoting, Stride stop, Jump Stop, Passes- Chest Pass, Back Pass, Over Head Pass, Head Push Pass etc

Unit 3 Shooting- The Set Shot, The Jump Shot, The Lay-Up Shot

Unit 4 The Rebound- Boxing out, Tipping-in, Defensive catching, Offensive catching

Unit 5 Defence- Individual Defence, Stance, Defence against a dribbler, Marking a passer, Preventing pass reception

Module–VI

Unit 1 Advance Skills- Cross over dribbling, between the legs dribbling, behind the back dribbling,

fake and drive, tip off during jump ball.

Unit 2 Advanced Shooting- The Hook Shot, The Slam Dunk, All Post Moves

Unit 3 Fake and Drive.

Module—VII

Training of Various Skills

Unit 1 Dribbling Drills – Dribbling reaction, dribbling cones, dribbling tag,

Unit 2 Passing Drills- Wall passing, piggy in the middle, 2-player passing drill,

Unit 3 Shooting Drills – One player drill, around the world, lay-up drill, three-man shooting drill

Unit 4 Rebound Drills- One-Player drill, Tipping in drill, one on one drill

Unit 5 Defensive Drills- Zig-Zag drills, Denial drill, Two on Two play.

Unit.6 Fast break drills with three players and five players.

Module–VIII

Unit 1 Selection of teams and organization of short- term camps

Unit 2 Teaching and coaching aids and gadgets

Unit 3 Lay out construction and maintenance of play ground, equipment management

Unit 4 Precautions and remedial measures of basketball injuries.

Unit 5 Set plays, team offence, team defence, Free Time Play

Unit 6 Team Selection and Teaching /Coaching camps for 15 or 30 Days

Module–IX

Unit 1 Warming up , Stretching and cool down or warm down

Unit 2 Diet and Mental attitude

REFERENCES

  1. Drewett, Jim. Basketball @ Internet Linked, London: Ticktock Publishing Ltd. 2001
  2. Jain, Naveen. Play and Learn Basketball, New Delhi: Sports Publications, 2005.
  3. Sharma. Basketball Skills and Rules, New Delhi: Sports Publications, 2005.

PAPER XVI

JUDO (SPEMIE116)

JUDO

Module–I

Unit 1 Origin, history and growth of Judo in India and in the world

Unit 2 World, Olympic and National competitions. World championships and regional   championships.

Module–II

Unit 1 Rules and regulations of Judo competition

Unit 2 Planning the layout, construction, marking & Maintenance of the competition arena

Unit 3 officiating and officials signals

Module–III

Unit 1 Fundamentals of Judo: Rei (Salutation), Ukemi (Breakfalls), Shisei (Posture),Kumikata(Gripping), Shintai (Movement and Body Movement), Kuzushi (Making off Balance), Tsukuri and Kake (Technique)

Module–IV

Unit 1 Techniques (Nage-waza-throwing techniques, Katame-waza-grappling techniques, Atemi-waza-striking techniques) and tactics of Judo

Unit 2 IJF grading system

Module–V

Unit 1 Criteria of selection of players at various levels

Unit 2 Warming up, conditioning and training process

Unit 3 Training methods, planning a coaching camp: Annual, Weekly and daily plan

Module–VI

Unit 1 Psychological qualities of Judo player

Unit 2 Psychological aspects of Self-defence.

Unit 3 Methods of developing psychological qualities

Module–VII

Unit 1 Injuries in Judo: Knee injuries, head injuries, back injuries

Unit 2 Prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries

Unit 3 Nutrition for Judo players

REFERENCES

  1. Diago, T. (2005). Kodokan Judo Throwing Techniques. Kodansha International Publishers, Japan.
  2. Harrison EJ (2002). Coaching Successfully Judo. Sports. Delhi.
  3. Jain D (2003). Play and Learn Judo. Khel Sahitaya Kendra. New Delhi.
  4. Law, M. (2009). Falling Hard: A Journey into the World of Judo. Trumpeter Publisher, Japan.
  5. Putin, V., Shestakov, V. ad Levitsky, A. (2004). Judo : History, Theory and Practice. Blue Snake Books, Moscow.
  6. Takahashi, M. (2005). Mastering Judo. Human Kinetics, USA.

PAPER XVII

VOLLEYBALL SPEMIE117)

Module–I

Unit 1 History of Volleyball, the development of game in the world, volleyball in Asia, Volleyball in

India.

Unit 2 Organizational set up FIVB, AVC, and VFI

Unit 3 Recipients of Arjuna award and Dronacharya award.

Module–II

Unit 1 Warming up, importance of warming up, principles of warming up, methods of warming up:

general, specific and competition warming up, warm down.

Unit 2 Court making: Construction and maintenance of volleyball court. Essential and additional

equipments in volleyball.

Unit 3 Rules of volleyball and their interpretation.

Unit 4 Duties of officials, Beach volleyball.

Module–III

Unit 1 Teaching and training of the techniques: with analysis. Volleyball pass (over head pass),Under hand pass (Dig pass), Underhand service, Tennis service, Upper hand back pass,

Floating service, Pass in jump, Straight smash, Smash with body turn, Wrist outward smash,

Wrist inward smash, Hesitation and smash, Zig-zag smash, Back-court attack, Rising ball Jump service, One man pass with back rolling, Volley pass with back rolling, Forward

dive and pass, Single block, Group block, Setup. Training the setter and Attack on direct

pass from back court.

Module–IV

Unit 1Organization of competitions: Types of competitions and organization of competitions.

Unit 2 Systems of conducting the competition and world, Asia, Commonwealth, regional and national levels.

Unit 3 Methods of drawing, fixtures, to divide positions at the end of competitions.

Unit 4 Philosophy of officiating- mechanics of officiating, steps to improve officiating.

Unit 5 Pre-requisite characteristics of a volleyball player.

Module–V

Unit 1 Tactics: Tactical training, individual tactics in service, service reception, set up, attack, block and defence.

Unit 2 Group tactics:1) Service reception: 6 men reception, 5 men reception, 4 men reception, 3 men reception, 2 men reception.

Unit 3 Attacking combinations: attack by 2, 3 front row players and back row players and methods of teaching attacking combinations.

Unit 4 Defence: Methods of teaching the defence system. Free ball defence (defence with no

block). 2-1-3 forward angle defence. 2-1-3 backward angle defence. 2-0-4 defence system.1-

2-3 defence system.2-2-2 defence system.1-1-4 defence system.3-0-3 defence system.3-

1-2 defence system. Covering of the attack and methods of teaching.

Module–VI

Unit 1 Test and measurements: Specific test for volleyball (endurance, speed, flexibility, explosive

straights of arms and legs, jumping ability and speed endurance).

Unit 2 Tests for skills: Service- dig pass, volley pass, set up test, attack test, defence test.

Unit 3 Selection of players and team composition: Talent selection, selection of a team, selection of team captain, selection of starting six for immediate participation in competitions, team composition, scouting, preparation of scout report, procedures, areas scouted, using of scout report in individual player coaching and team coaching.

Module–VII

Unit 1 Psychological characteristics of a volleyball player: Psychological qualities required to specific position, methods of developing psychological qualities

Unit 2 Grading the team before, during and after the match, tactics of substitution and time out, rhythm of the game, switching of players, direct preparation of a team for a decisive

competition.

Module–VIII

Unit 1 Complex training, functional training, pressure training, concentration training, Will training, situational training, small court games.

Module–IX

Unit 1 Periodization and planning. Long term plan, annual plan, weekly and daily plan.

Unit 2 Injuries in volleyball, prevention and first aid measures. Nutrition of volleyball players, fatigue

and recovery measures.

REFERENCES

  1. Arora, Monika. Volleyball Coaching Manual, New Delhi: Sports Publications. 2005.
  2. Jain D. Volleyball-Skills and Drills, New Delhi: Sports Publications. 2005.
  3. Jain, Renu. Play and Learn Volleyball, New Delhi: Sports Publications. 2005.
  4. Official Volleyball Rules, FIVB. 2005

.

PAPER XVIII (SPEMIIE118)

GENERAL CONDITIONING AND MATCH PRACTICE

PAPER XIX CRICKET (SPEMIIE119)

CRICKET

Module–I

Unit 1 History and development of cricket- Bodyline and Ashes Series. Historical development of Cricket in England, Australia, West Indies, South Africa, New Zealand, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe and Bangladesh.

Unit 2 History of Women’s cricket.

Unit 3 History of Indian cricket.

Unit 4 History of One-day cricket

Unit 5 History of World Cup Cricket

Module–II

Unit 1 Cricket Controlling Bodies and its Organizational Set up- ICC, MCC and TCCB

Unit 2 Organizational setup, aims and objectives of B. C. C. I.

Unit 3 Standing committees of B. C. C. I.

Unit 4 Major tournaments organized by B. C. C. I.

Module–III

Unit 1 Layout and maintenance of the oval.

Unit 2 Dimensions of the field.

Unit 3 Pitch- Types of Pitches and preparation and maintenance of a Turf Wicket

Unit 4 Essential equipments, measurements of equipments.

Unit 5 Teaching Aids.

Unit 6 Warming up, importance of warming up.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Fundamental skillsBatting-Basics, Defensive strokes, Attacking strokes, Modern improvised strokes, Running between the wickets and Drills to improve the batting skills

Unit 2 Bowling-Basics, Out swinger, In swinger, Reverse swing, Off spin and its variations, Leg spin and its variations and Drills to improve the bowling skills.

Unit 3 Fielding-Ground fielding. (Stationary, on the run and Slide stop) Catching. (High, Low, Flat and Reflex Catching)

Unit 4 Wicket Keeping-Drills to improve the wicket keeping skills.

Module–V

Unit 1 The laws of cricket with interpretations.

Unit 2 Officials in Cricket

Unit 3 Umpires and their duties.

  1. Duties before the match
  2. Duties during the interval.
  3. Duties after the match.

Unit 4 Signals, Unofficial and additional signals

Module–VI

Unit 1 Captaincy: Qualities of a good captain.

Unit 2 Duties of captain

Unit 3 Symptom of bad captaincy.

Module–VII

Unit 1 Criteria for selection of players at various levels.

Unit 2 Warming up, conditioning and training process.

Unit 3 Training methods.

Unit 4 Planning a Coaching camp: Annual, Weekly and daily plan.

Module–VIII

Unit 3 Psychological qualities of cricket player.

Unit 4 Method of developing psychological qualities. Psychological Skills Training.

Module–IX

Unit 1 Injuries in cricket, prevention and first aid.

Unit 2 Nutrition for cricket players.

Module–X

Unit 1 Modern Trends in Cricket

Unit 2 Cricket Vocabulary, Award winners and Records.

REFERENCES

  1. A Handbook of Practical Training in Cricket, Mumbai: Jaico Publishing House, 1998.
  2. Bose, Mihir. A History of Indian Cricket, New Delhi: Rupa & Co. 1990.
  3. Bradman, Donald. The Art of Cricket, London: Robson Books. 1998.
  4. Coaching Youth Cricket, Australian Cricket Board, New York: Human Kinetics. 2000.
  5. Elliot, Bruce et.al. The Science of Fast Bowling, Mumbai: Marine Sports. 2001.
  6. Rundell, Michael. The Dictionary of Cricket, London: George Allen & Unwin. 1985.
  7. Smith, Tom. New Cricket Umpiring and Scoring, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. 2004.
  8. Stewart, Alec. The Young Cricketer, London: DK. 1999.
  9. The Laws of Cricket (2000 Code 2nd Edition 2003) Issued by BCCI.
  10. Tyson, Frank. Learn Cricket with Frank Tyson, New Delhi: Rupa & Co. 2002.
  11. Wills Book of Excellence: Cricket, Hyderabad: Orient Longman Limited. 1987.
  12. Wisden Cricketer’s Alamanack 2006.

PAPER XX (SPEMIIE120)

FOOTBALL

Module–I.

Unit 1 Origin, history and development of the game

Unit 2 Organizational set up of soccer in national and international level-administrative set up of FIFA.

Unit 3 Major competitions at International and National level.

 Module–II

Unit 1 Rules of the game and their interpretations

Unit 2 Mechanism of officiating, quality of officials

Unit 3 Lay out and maintenance of football field

Unit 4 Equipment specifications of the game

Unit 5 Players and match officials.

Module–III

Unit 1 Pre-requisite qualities of football players: physical qualities, motor qualities, psychological characteristics and sociological aspects.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Fundamental Techniques of soccer. Kicking:- Push-pass, low drive, outside foot kick, sweaing kick, high drive, chip pass, half volley, side volley, overhead kick.

Unit 2 Heading:- Heading the ball, throw in, Feints with the ball, tackling.

Unit 3 Goal keeping:- Collecting over rolling the ball, flying ball at hip level, chest level, head level, over the head level, palming the ball, diving for the ball, movements of the goal keeper.

Module–V

Unit 1 Tactics of the game; Team formation systems, W-M, 3-2-5, 4-2-4, 4-3-3, 4-4-2

Unit 2 Rational distribution of players, Total football.

Unit 3 Attacking tactics: Position attack, counter attack, elements of attack-dribbling, feinting, shooting at goal- team work and individuality, elements of defence, marking, non marking, zonal covering, combined marking, challenging the ball, tackling, playing safe and taking risk, specialist players and all rounder substitution.

Module–VI

Unit 1 Training Soccer play; General principles, warming up-general and specific, conditioning

Unit 2 Periodisation of training, long term and short term training plan.

Unit 3 Fundamental training, set piece play, pressure training, recovery, conduct of coaching

programme for short duration.

Module–VII

Unit 1 Selection of players; Identification of talents , basic training, team preparation

Unit 2 Role of a coach before, during and after the game

Unit 3 Psychological preparation for competitions.

Module–VIII

Unit 1 Common injuries in football; Knee injuries, head injuries, back injuries

Unit 2 Prevention ,treatment and rehabilitation of injuries

Unit 3 Nutrition for football players.

REFERENCES

  1. ASEP. Officiating Soccer, New York: Human Kinetics.2004.
  2. Bauer, Gerhard. Soccer Techniques, Tactics and Teamwork, New York: Sterling Publishing

Co. 1993

  1. Macdonald, Malcolm. How to Score Goals, London: The Kingwood Press. 1985.
  2. Moynihan, John. Socer Focus, London: Simon and Schuster. 1989.
  3. NSCAA. The Soccer Coaching Bible, New York: Human Kinetics.2004.
  4. Rees, Roy and Meer, Cor Van Der. Coaching Soccer Successfully, New York: Human

Kinetics. 2003

  1. Reilly T et. al. Science and Football, London: E & F.N. Spon. 1988.
  2. Reilly, Thomas and William, A. Mark. Science and Socer, London: Routledge. 2003
  3. Smith, Dave et. al. Football Skills and Tactics, Octopus Publishing Group. 2002.
  4. Ward, Adam and Lewin, Trevor. Junior Football, London: Bounty Books. 2003.

PAPER XXI (SPEMIIE121)

TENNIS

Module- I

Unit 1 Introduction of the game and historical development with special reference to India.

Unit 2. Important tournaments held at National and International levels and distinguished personalities related to the game.

Module-II

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS.

Unit 1 Grips

Unit 1.2 Eastern Forehand grip.

Unit 1.3 Eastern Backhand grip.

Unit 1.4 Western grip.

Unit 1.5 Continental grip.

Unit 1.6 Chopper grip.

Module-III

Unit 1 Stance and Footwork.

Module-IV  Basic Ground Strokes

Unit 1 Forehand Drive.

Unit 2 Backhand Drive.

Unit 3 Basic Service.

Unit 4 Basic Volley.

Unit 5 Over-head Volley.

Unit 6 Chop.

Module- V

Unit1. Rules and their interpretations and duties of officials.

BOOKS RECOMMENDED FOR STUDY

  1. Hawton, Mary. “How to play Winning Tennis”, New York: Eookthirft One west 39th street. 1979.
  2. Eighton Jim, “Inside Tennis Techniques of Winning”, New Jersey, Prentice Hall Inc. Englewood Cliffs, 1967.
  3. Jim Drewett, “Tennis @ Internet Liked”, Ticktock Publishing Ltd., UK2011.
  4. David Lloyd, “Successful Tennis”, Sackvile Books Ltd.,-1989

 

PAPER XXII (SPEMIIE122)

TRACK & FIELD

PAPER XXIII (SPEMIIIE123)

SPORTS SPECIALIZATION ( BASKETBALL/ JUDO)

Any one game theory and practical.

PAPER XXIV(SPEMIIIE124)

SPORTS SPECIALIZATION ( FOOTBALL/CRICKET)

Any one game theory and practical

COURSE CONTENTS: The General guidelines for development of required course contents in particular game/sport for Specialization are given below.

Note: The course contents to be followed for the purpose of developing practical knowledge regarding marking, rules & regulation, officiating, technical training, tactical training, psychological preparation & preparation of training schedules)

Module- 1: Introduction • Layout and marking of play filed/ground/courts and measurement of equipments used in Game/Sport.

Module- II: Techniques/Skills development: • Classification of techniques/skills. • Technique/skill training: Preparatory, Basic, Supplementary exercises. • Identification & Correction of faults. • Training for mastery in technique/skill. • Recreational and lead-up activities. • Warm-up and cool down for game/sports.

Module- III: Training (Means & Method) • Training methods and means for the development of motor abilities (Strength, Speed, Endurance and Flexibility) • Basic Concept of preparation of training schedules. • Tactical training in game/sport. • Psychological preparation required during competition in game/sport.

Module- IV : Planning of Training • Preparation of short term and long term training plans in game/sport. • Periodization in training of players in game/sport. • General/specific fitness tests and performance/skill test in game/sport.

TEACHING LEARNING STRATEGIES: The class will be taught by using lectures and demonstration, seminars, classroom discussion, videos, charts and presentations method. ACTIVITIES: Lecture//Laboratory Work/ Field Work/ Outreach Activities/ Project Work/ Vocational Training/Viva/ Seminars/ Term Papers/Assignments/ Presentations/ Self-Study etc.

PAPER XXV(SPEMIIIE125)

ADVANCE COACHING ABILITY & OFFICIATING

Any one game among Basketball, Judo, Football, Handball, Cricket

General guidelines for advanced coaching and officiating for each game should include

Module- I:

  1. Advanced Techniques/Skills development:
  2. Advanced Classification of techniques/skills.
  3. Advanced Technique/skill training: Preparatory, Basic, Supplementary exercises.
  4. Talent identification &Identification & Correction of faults.
  5. Training for mastery in technique/skill.
  6. Latest methods of Warm-up and cool down for game/sports.

Module-II: Officiating:

Mechanics of officiating.

Qualities of good official.

Duties of official (pre, during and post game)

Rules & their interpretations.

PAPER XXVI (SPEMIV126)

SPORTS SPECIALIZATION ( BASKETBALL/ JUDO/HANDBALL)

Any one game apart from the game taken in IIIrd Semester – Theory and practical

PAPER XXVII (SPEMIVE127)

SPORTS SPECIALIZATION ( FOOTBALL/CRICKET/HOCKEY)

Any one game apart from the game taken in IIIrd Semester – Theory and practical

PAPER XXVIII(SPEMIVE128)

ADVANCE COACHING ABILITY & OFFICIATING

Any one game among Basketball, Judo, Football, Handball, Cricket

SUBSTITUTE COURSE

HANDBALL(SPEMIE129)

Module–I.

Unit 1 Origin, history and development of the game

Unit 2 Organizational set up of Handball in National and International level-administrative set up of International and National Federations

Unit 3 Major competitions at International and National level.

Module–II

Unit 1 Rules of the game and their interpretations; mechanism of officiating, quality of officials.

Unit 2 Lay out and maintenance of Indoor and Outdoor Handball courts

Unit 3 Equipment specifications of the game, players and match officials.

Module–III

Unit1 Selection of players; Pre-requisite qualities of Handball players: physical qualities, motor qualities, psychological characteristics and sociological aspects.

Module–IV

Unit 1 Fundamental Techniques of handball Teaching Coaching: Passing, Dribbling, Shooting, goal-keeping , throw-in, throw- off, goal throw, free-throw etc.

Module–V

Unit 1 Tactics of the game; Team formation systems of play

Unit 2 Attacking tactics: Position attack, counter attack, elements of attack-dribbling, feinting, shooting at goal- penalty shoot, team work and individuality, elements of defence, marking, non marking, zonal covering ,fast-break.

Module–VI

Unit 1 Training handball; General principles, warming up-general and specific, conditioning

Unit 2 Periodisation of training, training for the development of basic fitness qualities of long term and short term training plan.

Unit 3 Fundamental training, pressure training, recovery, conduct of coaching programme for short duration.

Module–VII

Unit 1 Selection of players; Identification of talents , basic training, team preparation

Unit 2 Role of a coach before, during and after the game

Unit 3 psychological preparation for competitions.

Module–VIII

Unit 1 Common injuries in handball; Shoulder injury, Elbow injury, Knee injuries, head injuries, back injuries ankle injury

Unit 2 Prevention ,treatment and rehabilitation of injuries.

REFERENCES

  1. Jain D. Play and Learn Handball, New Delhi: Khel Sahitya Kendra. 2005.

SUBSTITUTE PAPER (SPEMIIE130)

HOCKEY